Read time: 4 minutes

Investigate adverse experiences when using herbicides

There are many reasons why you might get an unexpected result when using herbicides. Good records and proper investigation of all possibilities can help hone in on the cause.

A shuttle of glyphosate applied over the top of a Roundup Ready cotton crop was recently shown to also contain a damaging level of 2,4-D impurity, resulting in significant crop injury and yield loss.

The grower involved did not accept the suggestion that the crop damage was due to poor sprayer decontamination or spray drift from a fallow application of 2,4-D, and he was able to prove the problem was due to product impurity.

2,4-D herbicide injury in cotton after the crop was sprayed with glyphosate product contaminated with 2,4-D.

Other shuttles of the same batch may have been applied to fallow weeds where the residual 2,4-D in the glyphosate would have gone unnoticed. Full rate 2,4-D in glyphosate is known to compromise glyphosate efficacy, but studies of low-rate 2,4-D impurity in glyphosate could not be found.

Where can impurities come from?

While the agricultural chemical manufacture and supply chain in Australia is considered first-class and is highly regulated, there is an acceptance that the nil-impurity requirement for the manufacture of agricultural chemicals is unattainable in facilities that use multi-purpose equipment for synthesis, formulation and packaging of products.

Companies therefore apply their own quality assurance standards before releasing products for distribution and sale. If the level of risk posed by certain residual impurities in a product is underestimated, there is potential for instances of crop injury, pesticide residue in produce or poor performance of the product on the intended target weed, fungus or pest.

Mistakes can and do happen within the manufacturing process and chemical supply and distribution chain. To ensure that risks of contamination are minimised and that quality assurance protocols are followed carefully, it is important that any breaches or errors are identified quickly, reported and investigated.

Keep good records of each spray event, including batch numbers of applied product, to help identify the cause of adverse experiences with herbicides.

There are two important things to note: firstly, the current regulations specify that crop protection products must contain nil impurities (other than manufacturing impurities listed in the APVMA standard); and secondly, companies are required to recall product batches when contamination issues are identified. The Australian Pesticide and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) oversees a highly regulated system of registration, compliance and enforcement on crop protection products.

Assess potential application issues

When misapplication (wrong product applied, incorrect mixing, contaminated product etc) occurs, symptoms of affected plants are usually uniform throughout the treated area. It is often suggested that poor application technique or poor sprayer decontamination is the reason for crop injury or poor weed control results – suggesting a grower ‘own-goal’. Such potential errors must be considered, but if best practice spray techniques and spray rig decontamination procedures have been followed, product impurity should also be considered and investigated.

The chemistry of the product will determine the risk of residues being held within the tank and spray lines of the application rig. This is why there are differences in the sprayer hygiene requirements after using particular products.

Most modern spray rigs have impervious rubber and plastic, or stainless steel components, drastically reducing the risk of chemical absorption and subsequent extraction. Residues on the rubber surfaces are the main concern, and all registered cleaners will physically remove residues when used as directed, but cracked rubber components can present a contamination risk. All filters/strainers must be cleaned and all actuators and taps musts be cycled as the cleaner is run through the spray boom and tank loading system, agitators and tank.

Crop injury or poor weed control that is associated with just one sprayer tank load would suggest sprayer contamination. Effects from contaminated tanks are usually worse at the beginning of the spray run, with damage diminishing with spraying and tank reloading. The field pattern can provide clues to the sprayer filling routine in the field where the crop damage occurred.

The other major reason commonly cited for crop injury in spray drift. Although there is always some small amount of drift when agricultural chemicals are sprayed from a ground rig, the amount is down to ‘virtually safe’ levels within a few tens of metres. If the conditions are very windy, or the boom is too high, or the droplet size too small, spray could drift a few hundred metres from the application ground rig.

Spray droplets may travel a few feet to several kilometres from the targeted area, depending on weather conditions and spray application; but the potential for drift damage decreases with distance because droplets are deposited or become diluted in the atmosphere. The pattern of injury is normally seen most prominently on the section of the field closest to the sprayer that generated the spray drift, and decreases across the field.

During inversion conditions, a similar amount of product is subject to drift, but the drifting product will not dilute as much in the air, so concentrations at specific locations can be higher than expected in non-inversion conditions.

What to do if your crop is damaged or weeds don’t die as expected?

Along with several other possible causes, unintended application of contaminated product should be considered as a potential explanation for crop injury or poor weed control.

Keep in mind that if product impurity is the problem, it is most likely due to a low-dose effect that may be difficult to diagnose or may take longer to express in the target weeds or susceptible crops.

Finding the cause of an ‘adverse experience’ with herbicide is one of the most important reasons to keep accurate and detailed spray records.

If a problem occurs:

  • Take detailed, time-stamped photographs of the crop or weeds and record everything you know about the crop or fallow management, weather conditions in the weeks prior to the damage being seen, spray history of the field etc. If possible, geotag the photos so they can be easily associated with the correct field.
  • Record the relevant batch numbers of the chemicals used, which can be checked against the retention samples at the factory if necessary. Collect samples from drums of product used prior to the injury being observed (up to 14 days prior to symptoms being obvious). When you take samples, make sure there are witnesses who can vouch for the voracity of the evidence you have collected. Testing for one impurity (e.g. 2,4-D in glyphosate) costs less than $500 per sample.
  • Document the injury over time. For example, injury in cotton from low rates of 2,4-D will grow out in two weeks, but injury from higher rates, could last three to four weeks and are the most likely to result in yield loss. Similarly with weeds although the impact may be more difficult to document.
  • Mark out the affected area in the field to help assess crop yield loss at the end of the season. Note the pattern and intensity of the problem across the field.
  • Eliminate as many possible causes as you can. Re-assess the application technique and equipment, consider the pattern of damage in the field, look at the weather conditions for the relevant period of time and so on.
  • Test for herbicide resistance in weeds.
  • Report the crop damage or poor weed control. The APVMA administers the Adverse Experience Reporting Program, which allows anyone to report a problem with an agricultural chemical, including crop and plant damage, for example, plant death, severe stunting or significant yield loss. This is also the way to report poor weed control outcomes.

The APVMA acknowledges there is likely under-reporting of adverse experiences. The magnitude of under-reporting is unknown and provides limitations in quantifying product risk.

Investigations of spray drift are conducted by the relevant state government body, for example: NSW EPA (call Environment Line: 131-555), Biosecurity Queensland (call 132-523) and Chemical Standards Officer (Victoria) (call 03 5430 4463). Industry organisations will also support growers impacted by chemical damage to crops.

If the damage is due to factors other than spray drift, the affected party will need to take legal action and seek compensation themselves.

Related resources

Is poor weed control due to herbicide resistance?

Related Articles

Related Articles

View all
Article
Ask an Expert

Can drones provide early warning of herbicide resistance?

Tristan Steventon, StevTech says ultra-high-resolution cameras on drones can rapidly map weeds for spray jobs and monitor changes over time. Read More...
Article
News

Cost-effective dual HWSC modes

Using two modes of harvest weed seed control can maximise the feed value for livestock and minimise the impact of burning chaff. Read More...
Article
News

Redefining fenceline weed control options

Some new herbicide registrations may help growers regain control and reduce the risk of herbicide-resistant weed seed moving into paddocks. Read More...

Webinars

View all
Video
Webinar

Making Every Drop(let) Count – An International Perspective on Spraying Efficiencies

WeedSmart southern extension agronomist Chris Davey and Canadian spray technology expert Tom Wolf discuss efficient and effective spray application. Read More...

Videos

View all
Video
Webinar

Making Every Drop(let) Count – An International Perspective on Spraying Efficiencies

WeedSmart southern extension agronomist Chris Davey and Canadian spray technology expert Tom Wolf discuss efficient and effective spray application. Read More...

Factsheets

View all
Fact Sheet

Adjuvants – Oils, surfactants and other additives for farm chemicals

Spray adjuvants are used to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of agricultural chemical application. Read More...
Fact Sheet

Hazardous inversions and spray drift

Current regulations prohibit spraying of agricultural chemicals when hazardous temperature inversions exist. Read More...
Fact Sheet

Understanding pre-emergent herbicides and how they interact with the environment

Understand the chemical properties of pre-emergent herbicides and how they interact with the environment. Read More...

Subscribe to the WeedSmart Newsletter