Fact Sheets

Fact Sheet

Changes to herbicide Mode of Action (MoA) names

The global MoA classification system is based on numerical codes which provides infinite capacity to accommodate new herbicide MoA coming to market, unlike the alphabetical codes currently used in Australia. Farming is becoming increasingly global. Farmers, agronomists and academics around the world are now, more than ever, sharing and accessing information to assist them to grow crops, while managing sustainability issues such as herbicide resistant weeds. It’s important then that the herbicide MoA classification system utilised in Australia be aligned with the global classification system. This will ensure more efficient farming systems into the future and allow Australian farmers and advisors to access the most up-to-date information relating to managing herbicide resistance. CropLife Australia is working with key herbicide resistance management experts, advisors and the APVMA to ensure farmers and agronomists are aware of the planned changes. The numerical classification system should be fully implemented by the end of 2024. You can find further information by reading the factsheet and visiting the CropLife website here.
Fact Sheet

Sustainable glyphosate use in winter grain cropping systems in southern Australia

The number of glyphosate resistant weed species present in winter grain crops, along fencelines and in irrigation channels in Australia. You can reduce the risk of glyphosate resistance in weeds if you follow the recommended practices in this factsheet.
Fact Sheet

Sustainable glyphosate use in Australian vegetable production

The number of glyphosate resistant weed species present in Australian vegetable production systems is increasing. You can reduce the risk of glyphosate resistance in weeds if you follow the recommended practices in this factsheet.
Fact Sheet

Sustainable glyphosate use on roadsides, railways, public utilities and parks

The number of glyphosate resistant weed species present on Australian roadsides and railway lines is increasing. You can reduce the risk of glyphosate resistance in weeds if you follow the recommended practices in this factsheet.
Fact Sheet

Sustainable glyphosate use in Australian orchards and vineyards

The number of glyphosate resistant weed species present in Australian orchards and vineyards is increasing. You can reduce the risk of glyphosate resistance in weeds if you follow the recommended practices in this factsheet.
Fact Sheet

Sustainable glyphosate use in northern Australian grain and cotton systems

The number of glyphosate resistant weed species present in northern Australian grain and cotton systems is increasing. You can reduce the risk of glyphosate resistance in weeds if you follow the recommended practices in this factsheet.
Fact Sheet

Farm Business Management Factsheet

Key points Effective decision-making is at the core of successful farm business management. Making informed, logical and timely business decisions is crucial to achieving business objectivess. Understand the different elements that influence how decisions are made and the possible outcomes. Consider who is responsible for the final decisions in the different areas of your farm business. Ensure the decision is finalised and implemented in a timely manner. Want to link to this fact sheet/publication? Full article can be found here
Fact Sheet

Wild radish management and strategies to address herbicide resistance

Wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) is one of the most widespread and competitive broadleaf weeds of Australian cereal-growing regions. Increasing resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action is forcing growers to adopt diverse and integrated weed-control strategies to deal with this weed.
Fact Sheet

Common weeds of grain cropping

GRDC's 'The Common Weeds of Grain Cropping – The Ute Guide' aims to help growers, advisers, researchers and students to identify the most common weeds of grain cropping systems in Australia.
Fact Sheet

Northern IWM factsheet – common sowthistle

Common sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus L.), also known as milk thistle, is a dicotyledonous annual weed. The plants are erect and fleshy and possess hollow, smooth stems that exude a milky latex when damaged. The weed can grow up to 1.5 m in height. Plants of common sowthistle can be either present as a rosette or upright in their growth form. Its leaves may vary in colour and the amount of serration on their margins (Figure 1). Common sowthistle seeds possess a pappus, which helps in seed dispersal through the wind.
Fact Sheet

Windmill grass – Northern Region

Windmill grass (Chloris truncata R.Br.), also known as umbrella grass or blow-away grass, is a short-lived perennial species that has recently been identified as resistant to glyphosate. This weed is becoming more dominant in southern Australian farming systems and is steadily encroaching on Queensland. To better manage this key weed, we need to understand its ecology and what management tactics are effective for its control.
Fact Sheet

Mixing requirements for spraying operations

Mixing order is very important to ensure that tank mixed products perform to their potential. Understanding formulation type and adjuvant type are an important part of getting the mixing order right. If in doubt about the compatibility of products in a tank mix, contact the manufacturers and conduct a jar test to ensure they will mix. Key Points Understand what the formulation type is for each product and adjuvant being used. Never bring concentrated products into contact with each other through mixing equipment or in low tank volumes. Know the correct mixing order for every tank mix you use.

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