array(5) {
  ["post_type"]=>
  array(3) {
    [0]=>
    string(5) "audio"
    [1]=>
    string(7) "content"
    [2]=>
    string(5) "video"
  }
  ["posts_per_page"]=>
  int(12)
  ["orderby"]=>
  array(1) {
    ["date"]=>
    string(4) "DESC"
  }
  ["paged"]=>
  int(1)
  ["tax_query"]=>
  array(2) {
    ["relation"]=>
    string(3) "AND"
    [0]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(3) {
        ["taxonomy"]=>
        string(3) "tag"
        ["field"]=>
        string(7) "term_id"
        ["terms"]=>
        int(86)
      }
    }
  }
}
Resource Type Template - WeedSmart

Narrow Windrow Burning (NWB)

Narrow Windrow Burning (NWB), is one of the most common HWSC methods chosen by farmers. It’s relatively easy to adopt and provides good results for weed management, but it does have its fair share of problems.

It is time-consuming; comes with a high nutrient removal cost; removes much of the ground cover from the paddock; there is a risk of fire escapes, and it is difficult to achieve a good burn contained to the windrow over the entire farm.

For these reasons, we are seeing many growers moving to some of the other tools that focus on the chaff fraction only. NWB is a bit of an art form and there are some core steps you need to take to get a job done well. Firstly, you have to harvest low. Secondly, you have to make sure you pick the right time to conduct your burn.

This is when the grass fire index is between two and 10. A light crosswind is ideal, and ideally, light up every 200-400m.

Article
News

Australian grain growers tackle herbicide resistance

Australian grain growers are responding to the challenge of increasing herbicide resistance in weeds head on through the adoption of integrated weed management practices. Read More...
Article
News

Aussie HWSC innovation goes global

When Australian farmers and researchers began using harvest weed seed control, it kick-started a revolution in weed management. Read More...
Article
Ask an Expert

What can I do at harvest to reduce my future weed burden?

Harvest time is an important opportunity to assess weed burden across the farm and be proactive about driving down the weed seed bank. Read More...
Case Study
Case Study

Andrew Kenny, Badgingarra WA

Andrew and Gina Kenny (Badgingarra, WA) use an integrated program of crop rotation, mouldboard ploughing, grazing and chaff lining to keep their weed numbers low. Read More...
Case Study
Case Study

Mat Freeman, Walkaway WA

While fixing the constraints associated with non-wetting sands is the primary reason for mouldboard ploughing, there is also a weed control benefit. Read More...
Article
Ask an Expert

Is HWSC useful against weeds that shed seeds early?

...
Article
Article

Harvest weed seed control in a nutshell

There are six HWSC systems currently being used on Australian farms and they have all been developed by farmers. Read More...
Case Study
Case Study

Brad Jackson, Gurley NSW

The 1700 ha family operation is based on a robust winter cropping program featuring wheat, barley, chickpea, canola and linseed to help keep weed numbers low and manage risk. Read More...
Case Study
Case Study

Edwards family, Port Broughton SA

Pete Edwards is doing everything in his power to stop herbicide resistance in brome grass and wild radish. Read More...
Case Study
Case Study

Warwick & Di Holding, Yerong Creek NSW

The Holdings invested in two EMAR chaff decks designed to place weed seed-laden chaff from the harvester onto permanent wheel tracks Read More...
Case Study
Case Study

John Stevenson, Lockhart NSW

At Warakirri Cropping Trusts’ ‘Orange Park’, manager John Stevenson has set up a crop rotation that is profitable and able to combat herbicide resistance in weeds. Read More...
Case Study
Case Study

Kohlhagen Family, NSW

The Kohlhagens have developed and implemented a comprehensive weed management program for their 100 per cent cropping operation in southern NSW. Read More...

Subscribe to the WeedSmart Newsletter