Webinars

Video
Video

What considerations should be made for glyphosate tolerant canola?

 
Jump to a section

Simon’s client experience with RR Canola and decision-making process 00:27
What’s the decision-making process when it comes to growing a glyphosate tolerant variety over conventional/TT canola? 01:36
Herbicide strategy & resistance testing: 02:44
Timing of glyphosate sprays 05:02
Varietal performance 07:06
Broadleaf weeds 09:33
Dealing with survivors, WeedSmart Big 6 11:12
Desiccation & windrowing 13:48
GM canola marketing 14:46
On-farm storage 15:14

In this new segment, WeedSmart Shorts, our expert agronomists around the country interview experts on topics in a ‘Question and Answer’ video format.
Simon was kind enough to be our first guest and Jana covers lots of important points with him throughout the interview. Above, you can find what questions are covered if you’d like to jump to one of the specific topics highlighted.
Simon says there has been uptake by his clients of glyphosate tolerant canola in South Australia, but there has been a varied response.

“We are finding that some are wanting to try a paddock, some are wanting to sit back and see how it goes. So, it is probably very similar to what happened in Victoria when it rolled out there as an option,” he says.
South Australian farmers in the past have been able to control the weeds with the existing canola options they have, says Simon, but what they are finding now is there is an increase in clethodim resistance, particularly at higher rates and so that is what is likely to be driving the decision-making process around what other canola options are available, such as RR canola.
While it is exciting to have another option for SA growers, Simon says it is critical that growers know their ryegrass resistance status before committing to planting glyphosate tolerant canola.
“Testing is the backbone behind the decision making around canola options and so once we’re aware of what herbicides still work effectively, that’s where we’re able to make a good, informed decision.”
Simon said it was important to know what works on ryegrass across the whole spectrum of herbicide groups.
“An example is, I did some testing for a new client recently and one of his populations came back as 80% resistant to glyphosate. Now, had we not done that test and put glyphosate resistant canola into that paddock, we would’ve been facing a disaster, but because we had that information on hand, we knew what our options were and what they weren’t,” Simon says.
 
 

Video
Video

Considerations for pre-emergent herbicides with dry sowing

In this webinar, we focus on what factors influence the residual control of weeds by pre-emergent herbicides with a focus on Trifluralin, Sakura and new-to-market herbicides.
Join Chris Davey, YPAG and WeedSmart Extension Agronomist and Mark Congreve, ICAN Senior Agronomist as they assess the sowing issues in South Australia and discuss strategies on using pre-emergents.
Factors covered include

Soil type/texture
Rainfall forecast (after application)
Characteristics of the herbicide
Characteristics of the crop
Sowing time (tine vs disc) – sowing depth, speed, soil throw, stubble
Resistance status

GRDC Spray Application Manual
This Spray Application GrowNotes™ manual provides information on how various spraying systems and components work, along with those factors that the operator should consider to ensure the sprayer is operating to its full potential.
This manual focuses on issues that will assist in maintaining the accuracy of the sprayer output while improving the efficiency and safety of spraying operations. It contains many useful tips for your spray operations.

Video
Webinar

Farmer questions answered on Group G herbicides and optimum application temperature

In this follow-up to last year’s webinar on Group Gs, Dr Chris Preston, University of Adelaide, Professor of Weed Management and WeedSmart’s Greg Condon focus on farmer questions around Group G herbicide use.
They explain the new Group G chemistry in simple terms and address questions around what temperature range provides optimum herbicide efficacy.

Video
Webinar

How do I make the right decision on using Group Gs?

Choosing and applying the right pre-emergent herbicide can be difficult, particularly if herbicide resistance is becoming a challenge in a no-till system. Join Dr Chris Preston, University of Adelaide (UA) professor weed management and WeedSmart’s Chris Davey as they explain the new Group G chemistry and de-mystifies which Group G works best for winter cropping systems.

Video
Video

Double breaks – a double shot at annual ryegrass

Perhaps you’re a ‘short black’ wheat-canola type, strong on inputs?
Or a ‘long black’ type who likes to dilute their rotations a bit more?
Or are you a ‘double shot’, throwing in a few break crops in a row for maximum effect?
When it comes to managing annual ryegrass populations, Tony Swan and the research team from CSIRO Plant Industry and FarmLink, have shown that ‘double shots’ are the key. Growing two break crops in sequence (broadleaf crop, hay crop or long fallow) was more effective in reducing resistant ryegrass numbers to manageable levels than a single break crop or continuous wheat over a three-year rotation.
And it can still be profitable.

Video
Video

RIM: Ryegrass Integrated Management

RIM is a hands on, user-friendly decision support software that allows farmers and advisors to evaluate the long-term cropping profitability of strategic and tactical ryegrass control methods, on the long-term and at the paddock scale. RIM lets you test your ideas: How can you run your ryegrass down and profit up? New rotation? New technique?
View the full video here

Video
Video

AHRI features

Sustaining herbicides with harvest weed seed management
Rotate, rotate, rotate! Incorporating non-chemical harvest weed seed control methods into cropping systems provides another set of tools to fight weeds and to delay the onset of herbicide resistance.
View full video at the AHRI website

Video
Webinar

Testing all of your herbicides for resistance with Roberto Busi

 
Dr Roberto Busi
Roberto discusses what the current levels of resistance to knock-down herbicides (glyphosate and paraquat) are, resistance to new and old pre-emergent herbicides and resistance to clethodim.
The results are discussed with Peter Newman by analysing the pros and cons of herbicide resistance testing and the value of herbicide efficacy and resistance testing with new herbicides coming into the Australian market from 2021.

Video
Webinar

Glyphosate Resistance Update with Peter Boutsalis

Dr Peter Boutsalis from the University of Adelaide joins this webinar to discuss tips to optimise the efficacy of glyphosate and when and when not to use the double knock strategy.
Peter also shares the latest results from the GRDC-funded random weeds survey in the Eyre Peninsula and southern Victoria and how the resistance levels in these areas have changed over the last 5 years.

Video
Webinar

You don’t know what you don’t know about managing weeds

Agronomists play a key role in the northern region, not only in identifying and tackling crop weeds but also in protecting chemistries. In the face of this challenge, utilising the WeedSmart Big 6 tools is showing results in tackling problem weeds.
Join Crop Consultants Australia’s Director Ben Dawson, as he hosts Dr. Chris Preston and Paul McIntosh from WeedSmart and they discuss the role that agronomists can play in breaking this cycle.

Video
Webinar

New chemistry – what’s new, what’s coming & how to keep them for longer

There is a range of new pre and post-emergent herbicides coming to the market in the coming seasons which will broaden weed control options and use patterns.
As new chemistry becomes available it is crucial for all involved to protect the longevity of any new products and minimise the risk of resistance.
In this webinar, WeedSmart’s Southern Extension Agronomist Greg Condon will explore the opportunities these new herbicides provide growers and how we can protect these herbicides using the WeedSmart Big 6.

Video
Webinar

Know thy enemy – biology of our most problematic crop weeds with Dr Catherine Borger

These weeds cost growers $22.5 and $1.7 million per year, respectively. Understanding the ecology of these species is vital to developing a successful weed management plan.
A five-year GRDC project produced results on emergence patterns, seed bank persistence, seed shedding and competitive ability of great brome and barley grass, in Western Australia and South Australia (‘Seed bank ecology of emerging weeds’ UA00156).
The project found that three to four years seed set control was needed to remove a great brome or barley grass soil seed bank.
Great brome had high seed production in Western Australia and South Australia. Barley grass had much higher seed production in South Australia than Western Australia. Great brome grass and barley grass reduced crop yield, and in 2019, great brome at low to high densities reduced economic returns from a Mace wheat crop at Wongan Hills by $90-205/ha. Barley grass reduced economic returns of wheat by $67-138/ha.
Data on weed ecology and competitive ability was used to update a decision support tool; the Weed Seed Wizard (WSW).
The updated model was used to investigate harvest weed seed control (HWSC) as a potential management technique for great brome grass and barley grass.
The modelling indicated that harvest weed seed control is a valuable tool in the management of these species, even in the years where most weed seed is shed prior to harvest.
You can read Catherine’s paper here: Great brome and barley grass – modelling the long-term value of harvest weed seed control

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