Alternative Herbicides for Management of Group A Herbicide-Resistant Barley Grass in Field Pea

Barley grass is a problematic annual weed species in Australia, typically growing in areas with less than 425 mm of rainfall. It is commonly found in crop fields and pastures, on roadside verges and in livestock enclosures. Although valued for animal feed in pastures early in the season, upon maturity the long barbed awns of barley grass seeds irritate livestock and entangle in wool, reducing productivity and product quality. Barley grass can also serve as a host for pathogenic fungi and nematodes in cereal-growing areas.

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Fact Sheet

Farm Business Management Factsheet

Key points Effective decision-making is at the core of successful farm business management. Making informed, logical and timely business decisions is crucial to achieving business objectivess. Understand the different elements that influence how decisions are made and the possible outcomes. Consider who is responsible for the final decisions in the different areas of your farm business. Ensure the decision is finalised and implemented in a timely manner. Want to link to this fact sheet/publication? Full article can be found here
Fact Sheet

Wild radish management and strategies to address herbicide resistance

Wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum) is one of the most widespread and competitive broadleaf weeds of Australian cereal-growing regions. Increasing resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action is forcing growers to adopt diverse and integrated weed-control strategies to deal with this weed.
Fact Sheet

Common weeds of grain cropping

GRDC's 'The Common Weeds of Grain Cropping – The Ute Guide' aims to help growers, advisers, researchers and students to identify the most common weeds of grain cropping systems in Australia.
Fact Sheet

Northern IWM factsheet – common sowthistle

Common sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus L.), also known as milk thistle, is a dicotyledonous annual weed. The plants are erect and fleshy and possess hollow, smooth stems that exude a milky latex when damaged. The weed can grow up to 1.5 m in height. Plants of common sowthistle can be either present as a rosette or upright in their growth form. Its leaves may vary in colour and the amount of serration on their margins (Figure 1). Common sowthistle seeds possess a pappus, which helps in seed dispersal through the wind.

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