View time: 67 minutes

Frost risk mitigation and growing a crop worth frosting

Webinar Series: Kick off early to get the edge on weeds

Webinar 2: Frost mitigation

Frost is devastating and unfortunately, more frequent events are predicted to occur right up until 2030.

So, what can you do about it?

Webinar 2 of our series, Growing a crop worth frosting, addresses how climate change means more weather events like experienced in 2016, will continue to impact crops.

Therefore, mitigating the risks is becoming more important, especially in frost-prone areas like those in the southern part of Western Australia.

Correct early crop sowing strategies can be unravelled by a frost event later in the season. Early sowing is a proven strategy which can be used to minimise the weed burden and maximise crop yield.

The question remains on how to manage the risk?

You can watch the below webinar for insights into how you can grow a crop worth frosting.

Ben Biddulph and Garren Knell explain the risks and how to minimise the downside of a frost event without delaying planting.

 

Webinar 1: Choosing optimum crop seed traits

The first part of this series was Webinar 1: Choosing optimum crop seed traits.

NSW DPI’s Rohan Brill investigates the performance of open-pollinated and hybrid canola cultivars across varied cropping environments. He discusses how choosing the right seed traits and early planting can increase yield and maintain pressure on weeds.

Along with choosing clean, large crop seed to promote early vigour, planting depth and time of planting are factors affecting crop competitiveness.

If you’d like to catch up on this webinar, you can find it here.

 

Podcasts

If you’d like to hear more on this topic, you can listen to our podcast with Garren Knell and farmer Gary Lang.

Gary farms in a frost-prone area in Wickepin, Western Australia. To take a listen, click here.

You can also listen to our podcast on spraying weeds and choosing seeds, which ties in with our Webinar on crop competition.

We chat with Nufarm Australia Spray Application Specialist Bill Gordon. He gives some great tips and insights on correct set-up. Rohan Brill also joins us for insight on choosing canola seeds and the benefits of crop competition!

Click here to listen.

 

 

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