View time: 60 minutes

Post emergent herbicides

Part 1: Spray small radish twice

Western Australian research reveals that careful timing, effective application and using different herbicide groups are more important than product choice for controlling wild radish. A range of herbicide combinations can provide effective control of herbicide-resistant wild radish if small plants were sprayed twice and attention is given to achieving good herbicide coverage. Peter Newman (Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative) and agronomist Grant Thompson (Crop Circle Consulting) discuss the results of their wild radish research.

Resources

 

Part 2:When is it worth rotating from clethodim (Select®) to butroxydim (Factor®)?

Is there any value in rotating the post-emergent herbicides clethodim (Select®) and butroxydim (Factor®)? The research suggests that Factor® will sometimes kill plants that are moderately-resistant to Select® that could help in driving down the weed seed bank. Dr Peter Boutsalis from the University of Adelaide discusses his latest research and observations using both products with AHRI’s Peter Newman.

Related Articles

View all
Video
Webinar

How to make the right decision on using Group Gs in the Northern cropping system

Group Gs have a place in northern cropping systems both in summer and winter crop scenarios. We ask Andrew Somervaille to explain Group G use in both systems and the most optimum use of different Group G products given the range of seasonal conditions in the northern cropping region.
Video
Webinar

How do I make the right decision on using Group Gs?

Choosing and applying the right pre-emergent herbicide can be difficult, particularly if herbicide resistance is becoming a challenge in a no-till system. Join Dr Chris Preston, University of Adelaide (UA) professor weed management and WeedSmart’s Chris Davey as they explain the new Group G chemistry and de-mystifies which Group G works best for winter cropping systems.
Audio
Podcast

What matters more? Crop sequence or seeder?

Why were the batsmen tampering with the ball, shouldn’t that be the bowler’s job? These are all questions that were being asked by a local project committee of growers and advisers, and there was only one way to answer them. Enter Tony Swan from CSIRO. He and his team embarked on a massive, long-term research effort in Temora NSW, working with FarmLink Research to make it happen. The trial ran from 2014 to 2017 and the preliminary results are in. And the winner is… DIVERSITY. (Insert a fist pump from Professor Steve Powles here!) Diverse crop rotations, including a double break, premium herbicides, with some extra crop competition courtesy of barley thrown in, and we have a winner. This diverse crop rotation smashed ryegrass numbers down from 1864 plants/m2 to 145 plants/m2 in just three years, and it was also the most profitable rotation. Article courtesy AHRI. Link the full article can be found here
Video
Video

Double breaks – a double shot at annual ryegrass

Perhaps you’re a ‘short black’ wheat-canola type, strong on inputs? Or a ‘long black’ type who likes to dilute their rotations a bit more? Or are you a ‘double shot’, throwing in a few break crops in a row for maximum effect? When it comes to managing annual ryegrass populations, Tony Swan and the research team from CSIRO Plant Industry and FarmLink, have shown that ‘double shots’ are the key. Growing two break crops in sequence (broadleaf crop, hay crop or long fallow) was more effective in reducing resistant ryegrass numbers to manageable levels than a single break crop or continuous wheat over a three-year rotation. And it can still be profitable.
Video
Webinar

Handling weeds in a strip and disc system

Hear from Dr Michael Walsh, Sydney University and Greg Condon, WeedSmart on dealing with weed challenges in strip and disc systems. Growers are using a wide range of cultural tools with herbicides to successfully farm in high residue cropping programs.
Video
Webinar

Testing all of your herbicides for resistance with Roberto Busi

  Dr Roberto Busi Roberto discusses what the current levels of resistance to knock-down herbicides (glyphosate and paraquat) are, resistance to new and old pre-emergent herbicides and resistance to clethodim. The results are discussed with Peter Newman by analysing the pros and cons of herbicide resistance testing and the value of herbicide efficacy and resistance testing with new herbicides coming into the Australian market from 2021.

Subscribe to the WeedSmart Newsletter